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October 28, 2021 7:05 AM
        

   
Manual Updated
Dj the GM
Posted at
Sep 28, 2021 05:36 PM
The human religion has been updated with incantation lists for most of the Dyadikí.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Sep 23, 2021 02:41 PM
Invigoration Potion: Similar to a healing salve, when drinking this holy mixture, the imbiber gains d4 points of Spirit without exceeding the maximum score. This cannot be used cumulatively on the same target in the same day. The potion will become unusable after one month of its creation.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Sep 12, 2021 03:27 PM
Update to Travel

Let’s summarize each pace. At a slow pace, the party is moving carefully and quietly. Everyone gains +3 to all Perception checks. Further, am option rule recommended is a pseudo-group check. If half or more of the party makes the check against a monster encounter as a slow pace and the opposing side fails by half its numbers, then the PCs perceive the threat before the monsters can, allowing avoidance or perhaps setting an ambush. However, if the PCs directly initiate combat, then all those on the monster-side that failed will have no turn for the first round. Additionally, the party can forage at a normal rate. Use daily or weekly foraging rules from the wilderness lore skill. Finally, any navigation checks for avoiding getting lost gain a +4 bonus to the role.

Normal pace is exatly that: normal. Most everything is a straight roll, except for foraging food. This is performed at disadvantage.

Finally, a fast pace obviously means they party will travel more distance in a shorter period of time, but while traveling so quickly, the PCs cannot forage at all. Further, all Perception checks suffer a -3 penalty. Those involving a monster encounters mean that the PCs who fail the check will have no turn for the first round. Finally, navigation checks to avoid becoming lost suffer a -4 penalty with traveling at a fast pace.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Sep 07, 2021 09:16 AM
Update to Grappling

After having held the victim until the grappler’s following turn the next round, the aggressor may choose to drag the victim along with normal movement; however, one’s movement rate is halved when towing another. If the aggressor is two size categories larger, then movement is not altered. Also, if the aggressor is two sizes larger, that grappler may opt to hurl and slam the victim for its Strength bonus in blunt damage (or appropriate damage for the terrain). In the case of slamming, the victim can be placed into any open adjacent space. Obviously, this maneuver frees the victim from the hold.
...
Uncommon Conditions
When grappling, if the defender has body weapons, such as claws or a bite attack, then incidental damage may occur in an attempt to grapple a being or creature. This does not apply if the attacker has body weapons. However, if such a defender rolls a “raw 8” or higher on competition, then the attacker suffers 1 point of the appropriate damage, claw damage over biting if both apply. If that attack normally has poison or other special weaponry, then it will be delivered (or trigger the save) whenever a “raw 12” is rolled in addition to the point of damage.

To be perfectly clear, if this is the initial grapple, the incidental damage will not require Strength feat save should the attacker win the competition; however, if the defender is attempting to escape, but still loses the competition, then the grappler will require the feat save (DC:11).

Additionally, if the attacker is large enough to perform a slam attack, then there a few caveats. If the grappler is ten feet or taller, then slamming can be thrown into any space up to two hexes away. Moreover, when an attacker is that large, it is possible to slam the victim into another target in range. This will deliver the damage to the victim regardless, but also acts as a hurling attack against the AC of the target, which if it strikes also inflicts the Strength bonus damage, which will always be blunt for the target.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Aug 15, 2021 12:33 PM
Update on Mind-Spirit Death

When wounded badly enough that the Body score hits zero or lower, then physical death becomes a real possibility. However, what happens when the Mind or Spirit score reach zero. In the case these scores reach zero, that becomes a potentially as serious as dying from a Body score. In fact, so serious, even though when a one-point axiom or incantation can still be cast, it might not be considered the best option.

When reaching zero but not going negative for either Mind or Spirit, then one degree of exhaustion occurs from the stress of the ordeal. Short and long rests do not restore points, but rather after one day of rest the score will raise to 1 point with the exhaustion still intact. It is inconvenient and requires the loss of a day, but a state of consciousness and mental awareness is still maintained.

Entering the negative values is when things become difficult. For the negative Mind scores, the character exists under the Drowsy restriction until reaching zero points. While in negative for Spirit, the character is under the Shaken restriction. It requires one full day of resting to restore a single point of Mind or Spirit when in such shock. However, at the end of each day, a special save is made before the point is restored. Using the save calculation as the “Death Save” for body, the wounded character must roll against the appropriate DC based on the current negative score. If successful, the point is restored; otherwise, it remains the negative value.

If a character remains in negatives for either Mind or Spirit for over 24 hours, then he or she is considered to be suffering a temporary insanity. The GM will have more details on what that means. If a character If a character remains in negatives for either Mind or Spirit for longer than three days, then an indefinite insanity will set in. A temporary insanity can be cured by restoring points; however, an indefinite insanity will continue even after regaining positive values for Mind and Spirit. In such cases, when ever the GM deems it appropriate, generally ruled by a failed Will preservation save, then the character will re-enter the necrotic state for several hours, possibly days.

Should the negative value become the negative equivalent for Judgment for a Mind score or Muse for a Spirit score, then the character becomes unplayable, inflicted with a permanent insanity, suffering effectively a mental or spiritual death and sanity break from reality, such as a complete cognitive divergence from reality for the mind or an endless coma of fear for the spirit.

To be clear, this only happens when the current score is negative. When resting that final day at zero, there is no save required. Depending on how adversely affected a character might be from this, the GM or player may wish to add to the story by introducing some mental issues, insanity, deliberate misinformation, etc. It should generally not be harmful to gameplay, as the penalty against the quality’s maximum has already suffered; however, there is no guarantee this misinformation will be safe. It may also be a way to introduce a different story or personality into the game.

Edited By Dj the GM at August 15, 2021 12:34

Dj the GM
Posted at
Aug 14, 2021 06:17 PM
Fantasy Physics, in the Adventuring section:

What fantasy writers tend to do by default is take a realistic-physics world and add magic. Let’s be clear: that is not Enchanted Realms. This is a world where gods grant powers to mortals to do their bidding, and strands of magical energy can be captured by thought, word and motion. This is not a world with earth-based physics, and it should not assumed to be one.

To be fair, the GM is the ultimate arbiter of how his or her world works; however, it is strongly recommended not to get trapped into chemistry, aerodynamics, fluid-dynamics, fossil records and all those sciences of our world. While Enchanted Realms absolutely has sciences and physics, players should not make assumptions they work the same way as ours; further, players should avoid arguing rules based on that premise.

That said, it is the GM’s duty to ensure that the physics of the fantasy world works consistently -- or if they don’t, understand why. Therefore, here are some suggestions of fantasy lore.

First, understand the triangular relationship of fire, lightning and ice. Fire is an effective defense against ice. ice protects hinders lightning; and lightning blocks fire.

Another important feature of the fantasy world is weather and crop-cycles. Forget photosynthesis and seasons based on orbital revolution of the planet. No, weather is controlled by greater air spirits, who can be angered. While these spirits, called “emasi” by scholars, prefer routine and normalcy, which explains the seasons, these beings ultimately command the winds, rains, temperature, etc. It is not that elves are really good at meteorology that allows them weather omen but rather their fey-blood that creates a connection to empathically sense the well of the emas in the region.

Diseases are not a collection of bacteria and viruses. Instead these are malevolent energies that spawn from an origin closer to miasma theory. Plants and animals do not have a cellular structure. Rather living organisms are structures of the four humours: blood, bile, phlegm and acid. Moreover, the chemical structure is constructed from the four elements: earth, water, air and fire -- with quasi-elements assisting in everything’s nature.

However, perhaps most importantly to grasp is that everything living thing, even undead, have a lifesong. This is an energy shell that surrounds and passes through the being. Perhaps some call it an aura or a bio-field. However, its energies are like a fingerprint, unique to every being. At the same time, patterns of a lifesong can identify the creature as a particular race, gender, temperament or even memory and intention. The lifesong is a very basic and essential concept of fantasy-world physics in Enchanted Realms.

Players and GMs should understand that when playing Enchanted Realms, it is not a Medieval Europe simulation.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Aug 14, 2021 04:40 PM
The online manual is being re-organized to better convey learning the system and the ideas it uses, especially for the person who has not every played this specific game. Please forgive any bad links that you may find. The process should be complete within one day.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Jul 24, 2021 01:25 PM
An addition to the poisons sub section:

Rhodo-Honey: This is a natural honey produced by grayano bees. The nectar can be used as an ingredient with powdered lobster tail to produce a powerful hallucinogen. The poison is a injury based poison and ingestion is too weak to affect a person. When a victim is struck by it, he or she must roll a Will save (DC:12) or suffer hallucinations which act as a violent phantasm, usually of something greatly feared and will temporarily loss 1 Mind point. The effect lasts for one minute (or 6 rounds). Even if successfully saving the hallucination acts real to the victim up to its next action fighting off the phantasm; however, there is no Mind lost on a successful save. While needing only a homeopathy skill to produce, the individual must also procure the rare nectar from the grayano bees or have a hive and the animal husbandry skill specific to them.

Edited By Dj the GM at July 24, 2021 02:00

Dj the GM
Posted at
Jun 23, 2021 10:14 PM
Movement Section Updated
As a base, a character or monster can move up to the number of feet listed on one’s character sheet. Any penalties due to armor or encumberment are subjected from the racial movement. This adjusted value is called the character’s “normal movement.” While this is primarily a measure of how far a character can move on his or her turn; however, there are many conditions, skills, magical effects and environment can alter the exact results.

When using a map, each hex represents 5 feet. Therefore, if a character can move 50 feet in a round, then during his or her turn 10 hexes can be traversed. This is true when the terrain is smooth, such as wood floors, open plains and worked stone. However, difficult terrain, like stalagmites, thicket-covered forests, or a treacherous staircase, cost double the movement cost -- every foot of movement in difficult terrain costs two feet. This means each hex of difficult terrain moved into cost 10 feet instead of 5 feet.

Another condition is when someone is prone and must crawl. Crawling also adds an extra foot to movement cost as well. Thus, for each hex crawled, it also costs 10 feet of movement. However, if crawling through difficult terrain, then it is cummulative; therefore, moving one hex would cost 15 feet. There are more detail about crawling and being prone in the Knocked Down details below.

There are several scenarios were movement is penalized. Below is a list of many conditions:
Condition Penalty
Mounting/dismounting horse/lizard steed 50% of Normal Movement in Feet
Mounting/dismounting gryphon-sized or larger creature 100% of Normal Movement
Pick up item from ground -10 feet Movement
Ready shield without shield-use -10 feet Movement
Standing up from prone 50% of Normal Movement in Feet
Unsheath/switch weapon -10 feet Movement

Further, when a magical effect or restriction is placed on a creature, unless otherwise stated, what is altered is the “normal movement.” Therefore, when quick step is used, the affected being has its “normal movement” increase by 10 feet. If under the bound restriction, the that being’s “normal movement” is halved. If struck by a ghoul, the victim has its “normal movement” reduced by 25 feet. The reason this matters is to ensure not miscalcuating the effect of armor when combined with additional conditions. Also, it might matter for determining whether that final hex can be traversed or not because there is no question about rounding. Either one has the movement remaining or the next hex cannot be entered.

Movement is also important for establishing position and controlling that space. The size category of a being determines how large of an area that falls under that being’s control. However, for these examples a human will be used, who occupies and controls one hex (or five feet).

Why this is important is answered by asking what does occupying and controlling that hex do? The short answer means this space is protected by the occupant and items in that area cannot be touched or manipulated without the space-owner’s permission. That said, there are conditions where permission is implied, and there are other cases where a challenge can supercede that permission.

Implied permission must happen most of the time or people would not be able to walk down a busy street. Therefore, the general rule is permission is only assumed to be denied to hostile creatures. Allies and other non-hostiles can walk through someone’s space as if it were difficult terrain, but they may pass through it. Hostile creatures, however, can only access the space controlled by that person’s permission or by forcing a challenge of some sort.

As an example, if the human in this example were standing over a knife but didn’t have an action remaining; therefore, being unable to pick it up -- then another person who had an action available could attempt to grab the knife. However, to do so, that other person would have to enter the hex controlled by the human. This would mean the item could not be picked up freely and doing so would have to be an action itself. Now as a result of that action invading another’a controlled space and being against the occupier’s will, an explanation of how the knife would be gained would need to be given. Depending on that description, the GM would call for either competition save against either Strength or Agility. If the grabber won the d12 challenge then, he ran by, grabbed the knife and moved to wherever he chose to end his movement; albeit at the risk of a flee-attack reaction. However, if the occupier won the competition, then the invader ran by, missed the knife (perhaps covered by the occupier’s foot), and then continued on -- also at the risk of a flee attack.

In the following round, both of the persons have an action available meaning, each is capable of picking up the item for free at the cost of 10 feet of movement. Whoever has the first initiative would declare he his grabbing the knife freely. The other person may interupt to declare he too would be making an attempt to grab the knife. In this case, both person’s would be forced to use his action to resolve the competition, which would happen on the turn of the one with the lowest initiative.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Jun 23, 2021 03:55 PM
Additional and updated verbiage in the SAVES section:

Finally, competition saves are when two or more creatures are trying to accomplish the same thing. In this case, the DC is determined by the save score of the others who are in direct opposition. An example might be if a loose dagger is on the floor and two persons want to get it, or when someone is holding shut a door while a monster is trying to break through. It is rare for more than two participants to be in a contest, but it could happen. Whichever contestant has the highest total score wins the action, such as gaining the knife or holding the door in the examples above. If, however, the result is a tie, then circumstance remains as it was, and the struggle continues (assuming all parties continue to struggle). Therefore, the knife would still be free, or the door in a mostly closed state.

As for actions in combat that result in a competition, there are a few seemingly minor details; however, they become very important to game-play and strategy. To pick up an item that is loose on the ground, free on a table or some other similar circumstance, there is a 10 feet movement restriction imposed for picking it up. Also, while not requiring an action, one must still have an action available to pick said item up. This merely means when it is a character’s turn, the item should be grabbed before taking an action rather than after, which also means an action causing an item to become loose or free cannot be instantly snatched up by the provoking character. However, the provoking character could walk to the item and occupy its space, effectively controlling that area, even though he or she cannot yet quite grab it.

At this point, any other characters in the area, who still have an action remaining for that round, could freely go get that item with the movement penalty reduced, and still have his or her action available. However, if the space of the item is controlled by another person and the item is still loose, then an action must be used to grab the loose item. Because the space is controlled by another, there would have to be a competition to see whether the attempt to grab the item worked. The subquality to use would depend on the aggressor’s method of getting the item. If he charged pushing on the occupier of the space, then the GM would likely call for a Strength competition. If the aggressor performed a running slide and snatched it quickly before the occupier could respond, then the GM would probably have it be an Agility competition.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Jun 23, 2021 03:03 PM
Weapon Lock, requires One of Bludgeoning, Cleaving, Pole-arms or Slashing
This skill focuses on pinning the opponent’s weapon in a way that it is locked from attacking. It can only be employed with non-improvised, melee weapons that do not have the light tag, and also it can only be used against actual weapons; it cannot prevent a martial artist or monster with body weapons. One could use a longsword with weapon lock but not a chair from the bar. Furthermore, weapon lock could not be used against a silk sleeve either. Another restriction is it can only be used against an opponent one-size category larger who are also bipeds. Therefore, it is possible for an elf to lock an ogre's club, but a mounted fighter would be immune to weapon lock from the same elf. To determine success only a single attack is used. This means single-die advantage/disadvantage rules would apply for two d20s. However, for the normal attack, a d20 is rolled against the opponents AC. Rather than the Strength, for this maneuver, Agility is added to the die roll. Also, weapon quality and any magic are added to the roll. Some weapons may also offer additional bonuses. If the wielder has weapon forte in the weapon used, then an additional +3 bonus is gained on the attack roll. There are more details about scenarios using this skill in the Weapons Negating section.

Weapon Disarm, requires Weapon Lock
This skill uses the techniques of Weapon Lock and improves upon them to remove an opponent’s weapon. Because of the improvement in skill, this allows light weapons to be employed in the maneuver as well. When using it do disarm an opponent, the same single attack and bonuses from weapon lock are used. Just to clarify, the subquality used in the attack as a modifier is Agility. On success, the opponent has options, but may use a reaction to resist the disarming, assuming the target has one available. If not having a reaction available or choosing not to resist, the weapon is removed from the combatant’s grip. By resisting the disarm, the victim is taking a gamble to maintain the grasp with the cost being some minor damage and is no guaranty of it working. The inflicted damage is a base of 2 points, but the attacker’s weapon weight-size (light, medium or heavy) adds to injury. This means 2 points when attacking with a light weapon, 3 points for a medium one and 4 points for heavy. After accepting the damage, the victim makes an Agility save competition against the attacker. However, the attacker is at advantage on the d12 roll. If the victim wins the competition, then the weapon remains held; if not, then the weapon is thrown some distance away base on the chart below:
Attacker’s WeaponDistance
Light 0 to 1 hexes (d2-1)
Medium1 to 3 hexes (d3)
Heavy1 to 4 hexes (d4)
There are more details about scenarios using this skill in the Weapons Negating section.

***Weapon Negating Entry***
When performing combat between armed combatants, a desire of both sides is to find a way to neutralize the effectiveness of the other side’s weaponry. In the hand-to-hand perspective, the skills weapon lock and weapon disarm are some of the most effective ways to accomplish that goal. Weapon lock is a skill that uses a weapon in a way to lock the opponent’s weapon from being wielded effectively enough to strike. Weapon disarm is a skill that can be used in combination with the previous skill that physically removes the opponent’s weapon from his or her grip. While these are simple concepts, there are a lot of scenarios that have to be understood and considered.

With both skills, the attacker rolls a single chance to lock or remove the opponent’s weapon. It is important to note no matter how many skills complement these maneuvers, no matter what bonuses are granted for a weapon employed, the success roll is a single d20. Of course, what this means is if there is advantage or disadvantage, then two dice are thrown using the better or worse of the two, depending on the situation.

Once the feat is successful and the attacker has locked the weapon or has disarmed the opponent, there are a few items that must be resolved. First, due to the nature of this special attack, a rebuff cannot be used as a defense to block the attack. However, the victim will be allowed the option to use a reaction to prevent the effect which does not require possessing any skill. Obviously, the victim must have a reaction remaining for the round. For a weapon lock, the victim is allowed to make a Strength save competition against the attacker as a reaction to pull the weapon free by brute force. However, the attacker is at advantage on the d12 comparison. All modifiers for size and environments are otherwise normal.

The victim of a weapon disarm can use a reaction to resist the disarming maneuver. This means the torque applied continues longer, perhaps the attacker strikes part of the forearm instead of gaining an effective fulcrum to pry the weapon free, the victim slips the hilt free but the momentum pulls the attacker’s weapon into his face, or yet some other explanation results due to the resistance. The end result of the choice to resist the weapon being disarmed from a rules perspective is the victim is taken a gamble to maintain the hold on the weapon; however, it costs some minor damage and is not guaranteed to work. The inflicted damage is a base of 2 points, but the attacker’s weapon size (light, medium or heavy) adds to injury; thus, the resulting cost for resisting is 2 points against light weapons, 3 points for medium and 4 points for heavy. Of course, the damage type will be equivalent to what the weapon delivers in melee. After accepting the Body damage, the victim enters an Agility save competition with the attacker. But as with the lesser skill, the attacker is at advantage on the d12 roll. If the victim wins the competition, then the weapon remains held; if not, then the weapon is thrown some distance away.

Assuming the success of these skill, then the weapon has become pinned or has been disarmed. There are now options for all parties to consider. When a weapon is locked, whether immediately reacted to avoid or not, using future reactions to pull it free with brute force in future rounds would automatically fail and the weapon is held useless. Further, any bonuses, skills or maneuvers from the wielding that weapon in combat are lost. For example, parry and the opportunity to rebuff or riposte are not permitted.

The wielder of the pinned weapon can free his or her weapon; however, there is a cost to do so, which is equal to 2 attack dice. This means if the skills of his or her attack with that weapon add up to 2d20 for an attack, then the next action can be sacrificed in whole to free the held weapon. However, if the skills add up to 3d20, then on the next action, 2 dice are sacrificed but a 1d20 attack can still be made. Conversely, if the victim only has melee fighting or is unskilled, then this sacrifice of dice becomes spread over two rounds.

Another option to free the weapon is if a third party comes and applies a successful weapon lock against the original attacker placing the lock. Even if the reaction to prevent the pinning of that weapon is successful, the first locked weapon is freed.

Rather than trying to use brute strength, the victim could choose to use a reaction to release the pinned weapon. If this was not chosen at the moment of attack, the victim could choose to use a reaction on either the attacks turn or own’s own turn to drop the weapon. Obviously, this does not free the weapon, but it would allow switching to a different one on his or her person.

No attempt to free the weapon is required. The victim might be contempt to take other actions that require only one hand, such as drinking a option from a belt pouch or casting a verbal-only spell.

Of course, when the employer of the weapon lock has his or her next turn come around, the decision to release the weapon and make a different attack or action is a choice. However, if the opponent's weapon is still pinned when the turn comes around, any action requiring the hands used to wield the weapon must me sacrificed to maintain the hold, but if not employing a two-handed weapon, then drinking a potion or casting a non-gestured spell would also be an option.

Like the victim, the entire time while maintaining the weapon lock, that combatant also loses the benefits from parry and other skills gained from active use of the primary weapon in combat. However, if the locker has shield-blitz, then a d20 of blunt damage can be inflicted - but only against the victim of the pinned weapon.

When disarming a victim, the attacker has no restriction after performing the maneuver. That said, the weapon is up for grabs. Part of luck and strategy is the timing of one’s action during the round. To pick up a weapon, there is a cost of 10 movement points, but as stated in the Saves subsection, while it doesn’t require an action, one must still have an action remaining for the round to pick up a free item. This means the attacker could not grab the weapon in the same action he or she disarmed the weapon, but if the victim still has an action, then it could be retrieved; however, understand that decision could make one susceptible to a flee attack.

Dj the GM
Posted at
Jun 22, 2021 02:18 PM
Riposte, requires Rebuff. [Is A Reaction]
This is an enhancement to the rebuff skill where a combatant performs a small counterstrike as a reaction in response to an attack. YThe counterattack is merely a single d20 in response instead of a full attack, but it still may inflict damage if striking the opponent's AC; further, no Strength bonus is added in the counterstrike but the weapon size may. This reaction may be chosen even if the incoming attack was unsuccessful and not requiring the rebuff; however, if the incoming attack was success and not thwarted by the rebuff defense, then no riposte counterstrike can be made. Weapons employed at the time of the reaction are limited to melee weapons, but also those with a heavy tag and improvised weapons are restricted from using of this type of reaction. There are a few weapons that can be used with riposte but not rebuff, the dagger being the most notable. While this sounds counter-intuitive, what it means is a dagger counterstrike from riposte can occur, but only when used as a reaction from a failed attack that doesn't require blocking.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Jun 22, 2021 10:32 AM
A few skills were recently reworded or updated. Those are included here:

Countermove, requires Rebuff. [Is A Reaction]
This is an extension skill using the rebuff reaction when being attacked. Using a melee weapon, the countermove redirects an attack to another creature that is occupying an adjacent hex from the original attacker. When employing this, a successful rebuff must be made before extending it to a countermove. If the rebuff fails to block the incoming damage, then nothing further can occur. However, if successful, the half of the total remaining damage can be pushed onto a nearby target by use of this maneuver. However, no special damage, such as infusion of fire or poison is transferred. Also, that partial damage can only inflict the new target if the highest die of the original attack is capable of striking the new intended victim’s AC. As an example, if a 3d20 attack with a heavy weapon and a +2 Strength successfully strikes the one capable of countermove with all three dice, potentially inflicting 7 points of damage. If the rebuff works, then 2 points from Strength still damage the original target, but 5 points are thwarted. Now, 2 points (half of the remaining 5, rounded down) can be redirected to the new target, assuming the highest die of the original attack can strike that AC.

Deflect Missiles, requires Melee Fighting and Agility 4 or Higher. [Is A Reaction]
This skill permits a reaction to potentially neutralize the entire attack to the target from an archery or thrown-weapon attack. If reacting is chosen to use, then a d6 is rolled and subtracted from the attacker’s highest die score. If this lessened score of the highest roll results in a number which would no longer hit, then that entire attack damage against the target is deflected away, preventing any damage from being inflicted. Moreover, if a raw 6 is rolled, then the attack is deflected regardless of the math, plus the deflector may choose to catch the weapon so long as one hand is free. However, if any value of the attack is a natural 20, the reaction cannot be used, as the attack cannot miss. Magical spells cannot be deflected, which includes any magical effect that turns normal ammo into a magical, non-corporeal projectile, such as some magical arrows. The GM will determine this if the effect or item is ambiguous of the magical enhancement. Furthermore, see the combat section for details on reactions.

Dodge, requires Melee Fighting and Agility 4 or Higher. [Is A Reaction]
This skill permits a reaction to avoid physical damage inflicted by melee. When struck in melee, the one dodging can the score of one of the attacker's dice, so long as that die-score is not a natural 20; however, it must be the lowest score of an attack sequence. If more than a single attack sequence was successful against the target, the one dodging can choose which attack to attempt to dodge. Further, the dodger is permitted to know whether one die or multiple dice were used in an attack. Once selecting the attack (lowest die) to avoid, a reaction is used, so long one remains for the round, and a d6 is rolled. The result of the raw d6 score is subtracted from the lowest successfully-striking die of the selected attack. If that adjusted score is low enough to miss the target AC, then the point from the die is removed and also the Strength bonus is removed from that attack sequence. Furthermore, any special damage, such as heavy blow crit-damage, infusion of fire, poison, disease, or necrotic effect delivered as part of the success of the attack sequence is also negated. Finally, if that is the only die of the attack sequence, then the entire attack acts as a miss and zero points are inflicted as damage. Otherwise, the attack was only reduced to a glancing blow that still inflicted some harm; the remaining die-hits count as one point of damage each in addition to any weapon-related damage and magic included in the attack. Finally, no natural 20 can be reduced or removed, nor can any of its extra dice or exploded values be removed. However, unless all the hits are natural 20s, then the lowest die can still be reduced. Magical spells cannot be dodged. See the combat section for details on reactions.

Rebuff, requires Melee Fighting and Strength 4 or Higher. [Is A Reaction]
Similar to the deflect missiles skill, this allows a reaction to be used in response to any physical damage inflicted by melee from a melee weapon. This requires a melee weapon being wielded to us the reaction; however, there are a few that are not designed to be used with this skill. If the reaction is chosen to use, then a d6 is rolled and subtracted from the attacker’s highest single die score. If struck by more one attack sequence, such as when an opponent uses shield-blitz, then the one reacting must choose which attack sequence to attempt to neutralize. Should the score from the d6 reduce the value enough so the score no longer hits, then the entire attack sequence fails to hit; however, due to the collision and method of thwarting the attack, strong opponents still force the Strength bonus through the attack. Moreover, if a raw 6 is rolled, attack sequence is blocked regardless of the math (except for any Strength bonus damage). Magical spells cannot be blocked. More details on reactions are in the combat section. Further, if under the restrained restriction, rebuff can still be used but at disadvantage where two d6s are rolled, using the lesser of the two rolls.
Dj the GM
Posted at
May 29, 2021 02:54 PM
There has been a slight clarification about Batfolk. I believed it was clear about their echolocation ability; however, part of the racial description has been rewritten to remove any ambiguity:

They also have a form of echolocation, which allows them to effectively see in the dark, even magical darkness, so long as they are not deafened; however, they must emit an 80dB high-pitched screech each round to do so (which is a free action on one's turn). This briefly activates a part of their brains which gives them synesthesia for a few seconds, effectively allowing them to "see" sound.
Dj the GM
Posted at
May 14, 2021 12:14 PM
The character sheet image in the Rules section was an older image. It has been updated.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 30, 2021 01:50 PM
This comparative infograph has been added to the Bestiary.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 27, 2021 03:48 PM
Concentration (rule updated)

Some axioms require concentration. The sorcerer can still partake in conversations and observe the surroundings, but while concentration is required no reactions can be performed nor can any new axioms, cantrips or invocations be cast. However, other actions, such as combat or drinking a potion are perfectly legitimate. Further, movement rate is half during concentration. Of course, a specific detail in an axiom could override this general rule. Should the caster’s concentration be broken, it will usually end the axiom. Thus, if the concentration is required to maintain or complete an effect, then breaking the caster’s concentration would free the victims. However, in some cases, such as conjure elemental, it does not return end as one might expect.

Concentration may be broken by inflicting damage against Body, Mind or Spirit. However, the caster is permitted a save against a DC:14 plus the number of points of damage to maintain concentration. If struck with Body damage, a Resilience save is used. If Mind damage, then Judgment; and if Spirit, then Muse.

Other options to break concentration are using arcane disruption as an action or counterspell as a reaction at the start of the caster’s turn. Obviously, killing, stunning or incapacitating the caster would also work. Lastly, the GM may allow for environmental events to break concentration.

Edited By Dj the GM at April 27, 2021 04:31

Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 27, 2021 02:19 PM
Throwing Items
Items like globes of acid splash, molotov cocktails, and vials of holy water are somewhat routinely thrown at enemy targets. How does that work in a system that uses weapon styles? And doesn't it say in Combat Skills that “those without a trained combat skill have no dice to roll for an attack?”, so how does that work?

Let's address these one at a time. The trained combat is discussing thrown items that are themselves weapons and can inflict physical damage on their own merit. Items like acid and holy water do not inflict damage because of the force and skill to strike with the “pointy end” or something. They inflict damage because of special properties they possess which when coming in contact of the recipient creates an effect. As such, these items are permitted a d20 for nearly anyone, so long as the one hurling has the physiology to throw the item. For example khaasta would not. If the raw score of the d20 strikes the opponent's AC, then the throw was successful enough to activate the effect in the description of the item.

However, skilled persons can throw “any item” better than untrained. Therefore, a person with ranged fighting is permitted to add an extra d20 to the roll. This does not adjust the damage of the affect in anyway. In fact, it is akin to rolling a single d20 at advantage in such that should either die score a hit, the effect happens. Further, if a person has hurling as a skill, then 3d20 is rolled, but likewise, it is only for the determination of contact with the opponent's AC.









ItemDamageNote
Acid Splashd4Alchemical Damage
Bonfire Blend1Fire Damage; very ineffective
Explosive Oild4Fire Damage; Combustion
Firebreather's Oild3Fire Damage; special attack delivery and save
Holy Waterd4Smiting Damage; limited victims
Sleep SmokeSleepJudgment save
Smoke of RestraintGrappledStrength save

These combat skills can improve accuracy on even magical effects. For incantations like guiding bolt or axioms like fire dart where a magical energy is hurled towards an opponent on a d20 and tested against its AC, then many spells will describe how modifiers work. However, if there is no explanation, the default rule for “throwing magic” is the spell provides the d20. Then if the caster has ranged fighting, then any Agility bonus can be added to the to-hit value. If the cast further has a hurling skill, then the total Agility score is added in lieu of the bonus. Again, these adjustments do nothing to change the damage or power of an effect.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 24, 2021 11:34 PM
There is a divine law is known as spiru-dynamics. What this means is the output of power from divine magic can never be greater than the input used to manifest the effect. This really only has one applicable scenario, and that is the healing of Spirit. While incantations can heal and restore Body points and even Mind point to produce numbers greater than the cost of the incantation, this is only due to the inequality of types of energies transfered. For example, the treat body incantation costs 2 Spirit but could potentially produce 4 Body points in return. This also true for treat mind. Remember, an introductory axiom costs only one Mind point and axioms max out at six, but the lowest incantation has an expense of two Spirit points; further, the greatest of incantations can cost up to twelve points. All of this indicates that spiritually divine magic as a unit carries more energy than the other qualities.

Again, while all of these healing and restoration spells are useful, the law of spiru-dynamics limits the amount of healing to Spirit that can be produce to the equivalent of the cost put into the incantation. Using again treat body as an example, the incantation heals Spirit on a d4; however, as a two-point cost, the maximum restoration to anyone's Spirit is two points. Granted, the d4 is a statistical measure and the roll indicates that on a raw 2, 3, or 4 the amount healed is the maximum two points, but this divine law prevents no more than two points to be healed for this incantation. To clarify, this is not just the spells in the examples, but also restore spirit and any other incantations that heal Spirit points.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 21, 2021 04:05 PM
Senses
Different races, monsters and species use different methods of sensation. The most universally referenced sense is vision. In fantasy world, there are several types of vision. The three most common are normal vision, darkvision and spirit sight. There is also night vision, which Jzaka, cats and owls have. Many other senses are used by different creatures. Here will be a brief summary of what each type is.

Normal vision is exactly what is sounds like; it is what you are using now, viewing the normal visual spectrum. What this means is in darkness, normal or magical, it is more difficult to operate and fight. Anyone using normal vision suffers a -2 to attack penalty for attack rolls in the night and disadvantage on attack rolls in total darkness. Also, movement is half of normal for traveling in darkness, including dim light.

Darkvision is unique eyesight adapted by subterranean and nocturnal creatures. It allows them to operate in darkness as if it were normal. Therefore, no penalties for fighting in the dark. Because most creatures with darkvision operate in the normal spectrum as well, there are no penalties for regular lighting. However, different species have different ranges they can see in the darkness. Half-orcs can only see 15 feet, while the svirfneblin can see out to 120 feet. When using darkvision, most of what is seen is a grayscale rather than color; however, there are a few exceptions to this rule when explicitly stated. Moreover, magical darkness thwarts darkvision.

Spirit sight is a special sensation for creatures that do not rely on vision. Most of the walking dead and “unliving” creatures, known as feratu, find their prey like this because many feratu do not have functioning eyes. Spirit sight is the detection of a living creature’s aura, biofield or life song. For those without it, it can be best thought of as the radar sense used by the comic-book hero Daredevil. Of course, this means those with spirit sight are not affected by light conditions; however, if one can mask himself from life-detection, then the spirit sight could not know he was there. Of course, this will not work for all feratu, for example vampires, as they make use of normal vision as well (or possibly darkvision for a dwarven vampire).

Night vision is an above-ground sight relying on the absorption of light waves in materials from sunlight. Even though the material is no longer reflecting current light, there is a shedding of the radiation, partly based on heat and partly based on the subtle glow of the planet's ring. Creatures with night vision have a special sensitivity to be able to see in the dim light of a double-moonless night; however, if being hidden from the atmosphere, either by going subterranean or inside a windowless mansion, those with night vision become as blind as normal vision.

Devil sight is a power form of seeing. This allows not only vision in any darkness as if normal, but also a being with devil sight can see through magical darkness as well. This method is used often by imps and lesser fiends of the devil phylum to endanger their victims.

Blindsight is a general term for being aware of the surrounding even without vision. In some cases this is due to hearing, air pressure or even magnetism from the ground. In other cases it is a bit more mystical. Most everyone has a minuscule amount of this sensation, but unless an entity is explicitly stated to have it, there are no modifiers to adjust. For example, zombies use primarily spirit sight; however, this is based on feeling presence of life forces around them. But one might ask, how then do zombies not walk into walls, know to use doors, not fall into pits? The explanation is a very low-grade use of blindsight -- not enough to identify the types of rocks, but enough to avoid tripping over them. Other creatures, constructs for example, have a high degree of blindsight. They cannot be blinded nor can deafness alter their perception of things around them. Beings using blindsight as a primary sense cannot see through walls, but they are typically unaffected by glamour type illusions.

Batfolk have echolocation. Lizardfolk have vibrational awareness. Some of these have details listed with the race and how members use the sensation; others merely translate to a bonus on Perception. However, it is important to knowledgeable of how these unusual impressions work. It allows a GM to rule for exceptions. For example, echolocation will not work for batfolk who are caught inside a silence spell. A method of mental anguish for a lizardfolk could be placing one in a deprivation chamber to block vibrations; it does no real harm but would become very stressful over time.

Psionics, telepathy and magical means can detect things normally undetectable. The specifics should be detailed in the skill, incantation or axiom. This brings up illusions and how they are perceived. Read the Illusions section for a better understanding. But in that vein, know that something can be invisible (to one type of sensation) and still be seen by others.

The long and short of this is that based on one's senses and awareness of what they mean, everyone should have a better understanding of how characters and monsters can sense and identify others. It also allows one to know when their character is at disadvantage, figuratively and literally.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 19, 2021 04:29 PM
The Elven Deities section has been updated. All but Lilyth, who can't be worshiped by players anyway, have had the details and dogma added to better understand this pantheon.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 18, 2021 08:19 PM
With the completion of the Undead the entire Bestiary has now been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 18, 2021 02:30 PM
Plants have been converted in the Bestiary.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 16, 2021 03:58 PM
All Oozes have been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 16, 2021 09:06 AM
Mutant monsters have been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 15, 2021 06:40 PM
The Humanish beings in the Bestiary have been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 15, 2021 04:39 PM
After a few more math tests and analysis, it was determined the new changes allowed priests gained too many incantations too early with not enough cost for each effect. To mitigate this issue, the Spirit cost for specific incantations have been adjusted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 15, 2021 02:12 PM
All creatures in the Glitch kingdom have been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 15, 2021 08:11 AM
Updates made to Backstab and Sneak Attacks.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 14, 2021 10:29 PM
The Giantkin creatures have been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 14, 2021 05:41 PM
All Fiends have been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 14, 2021 03:48 PM
The Fey section in the Bestiary has been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 14, 2021 02:31 PM
All Elementals in the Bestiary have been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 13, 2021 10:13 PM
All species of the Dracos kingdom have been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 13, 2021 05:06 PM
All Cosmic beings in the Bestiary have been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 13, 2021 04:31 PM
All Constructs have been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 13, 2021 03:49 PM
All Celestials have been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 13, 2021 02:21 PM
Subraces added to lizardfolk.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 13, 2021 01:06 PM
All Atavistoids have been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 13, 2021 10:04 AM
All Animals in the Bestiary have been converted.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 12, 2021 08:44 AM
Several typos have been corrected in the manual and GM Aide.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 10, 2021 03:40 PM
The first creature of the Bestiary has been updated.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 09, 2021 03:45 PM
The "Contents" in the GMAide section has been updated as well.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 09, 2021 01:44 PM
The "Contents Menu" in the Rules section have been updated to save space and present content better. The same method will be applied to the Bestiary and GMAide soon.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Apr 01, 2021 10:21 AM
New axioms available:

Instant Wall (Spell Points: 3)
Wall of Force (Spell Points: 4)
Disintegration (Spell Points: 6)
Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 30, 2021 09:10 PM
New playable races

Batfolk
Batfolk are atavistoid bipeds with batlike features. They have short brown, black, or gray fur and leathery wings in place of arms; however, from the wingbone, they have an elbow which extends into a prehensile and clawed hand. They have luminescent eyes in shades of red, green, or yellow as well as fangs. They stand about 4 to 4½ feet tall and weigh around 70 to 90 pounds. They have a walking speed of 40 feet and can fly at a movement rate of 75 feet for 30 seconds (3 rounds) until they must must recover for an equal time before flying again. They also have a form of echolocation, which allows them to effectively see in the dark so long as they are not deafened; however, they must emit a 80dB high-pitched screech each round to do so (which is a free action). While batfolk have claws, they cannot naturally use them effectively. Whenever a batfolk learns martial arts, then they can a free body weapons skill which can only be used in conjunction with the martial arts skill, meaning their initial claw strikes are 2d20. Batfolk actually have three sub-races; however, only the nutritional requirements make any differences. Fruit batfolk must consume fruit for three meals per week or they will become sick. Vampire batfolk must consume blood for one meal per week. Lastly, flower batfolk must consume nectar for two meals each week.

Gnome
Gnomes are a subterranean race related to dwarves; however, they are thinner and smaller, closer in size to halflings. Gnomes average slightly over 3 feet tall and weigh 40 to 45 pounds. Their tan or brown faces are usually adorned with broad smiles beneath their prodigious noses, and their proportionately-larger eyes shine with excitement. Their fine hair has a tendency to stick out in every direction, as if expressing the gnome’s insatiable interest in everything around. As a free racial skill, they have mathematics, which has led to a significant number in their society to become engineers. Gnomes also gain +1 to the Mind score as a starting character, but it cannot exceed 4 points.

There are four subraces of gnomes: forest gnomes, rock gnomes, deep gnomes and ice gnomes, though only the first two are likely to be playable. Forest gnomes live above ground in forested areas; however, they still sleep and build homes n burrows. They also have an innate ability to speak with small animals like a free language. This is the same as the priest incantation but is limited to small and tiny-sized creatures. Rock gnomes live underground and rarely come to the surface. Rock gnomes have darkvision extending to 20 feet. Deep gnomes, sometimes called svirfneblin, live very deep under the earth. They have darkvision with a radius of 120 feet. Further svirfneblin have a stone camouflage ability, which gives the advantage for rolling the stealth DC in rocky or cavernous terrain. Finally, the ice gnomes, also called barbegazi, live in very cold environments. Their habitats are said to be networks of caves and tunnels accessible near the mountains and glaciers through concealed entrances. The barbegazi resemble the typical gnome except for their larger feet. The ice gnomes are resistant to cold.

Half-orc
The vile and violent orcs are known for their pillaging behavior. During raids, the raping of human women is not uncommon. Occasionally, pregnancy results. And even rarer, a few survive to adulthood. The genetic factor of an orc seems to be stronger than most races in that the orc might not actually be able to be bred out of the lineage. Thus if a half-orc finds his or her orkane kind and mates with another orc, the offspring will be considered a full-blooded orc. Should the half-orc mate with a human, the offspring is another half-orc.

As a starting character, a half-orc has a choice of melee or ranged fighting but one must be taken. Additionally, the unique combination of genetics from orc and human produce an offspring with a +1 bonus to the body score, but starting values cannot exceed 4 points. Half-orcs are usually little taller than 6 feet but might grow as large as 6-9.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 30, 2021 02:36 PM
New items on the market:

Firebreather Oil: This is a form of paraffin, similar to kerosene, that is used by performers, held in their mouths and spit into a flame for a pyrotechnic effect. It is stronger that lamp oil with a lower flash point. This means it could be used as a weapon in some cases, although it is not very reliable. If one uses it to attack, spitting a mouthful past an open flame (such as a candle, tindertwig, or torch) to ignite it, then it could harm a target 5 feet away (or in an adjacent hex). One rolls a d20 as range and must strike an AC10, regardless of the target's actual AC. If rolling a natural 1, then the attacker accidentally inhales or swallows some of the fuel, leaving the attacker nauseated (as the restriction) until the start of his or her next turn. If successfully striking the target, the victim then makes a body preservation save with the DC being 20 minus the true AC value. If the DC becomes less than 2, remember than a natural 1 always fails. If failing the save, the target suffers 1 point of body damage due to fire.

Explosive Oil: This is combustible mixture of oil and alcohol which has a flash point that results in a fiery explosion. Molotov cocktails are the method of deliver for this oil when used as a weapon. If holding an open flame, such as a torch or candle, and also prepared with wicks, then one can light and hurl in the same action. To attack, one rolls a d20 as range, hurling the 8oz flask at the target successfully striking the target based on their AC. If missing the target, the use the rules of friendly fire to determine if anyone else was struck. Even if missing everyone, consider the terrain for combustibility. If successfully striking the target, the victim suffers 1 point of fire damage, plus must make a body preservation save using a DC at 20 minus the AC. If failing, the oil continues to burn over the victim, which will inflict 1 additional point of fire damage at the end of each of the victim's turns. An inflamed victim can use a full action to stop, drop and roll to extinguish the flames; however, it requires a body feat save (DC:6) to be successful. Moreover, to throw a Molotov cocktail of explosive oil, only three can be carried on one's person safely; however, a pile could be placed at one's feet, causing a loss of 2 points of initiative to reach down to get one for the action. Keeping them in a metal box at one's feet and closing the lid between throws is also possible; however, that comes at the sacrifice being able to throw every other round, with the action in between being used for closing and securing the box. All of that said, if the attacker suffers any fire damage or is exposed to a fiery effect while being in possession of these cocktails, then each explodes upon the owner.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 30, 2021 11:27 AM
New Adventuring Skills available

Brachiation (requires Climbing)
This skill enhances one's climbing ability to effectively move through trees and branches. This could be, but not necessarily, swinging from branches leaping with one's arms. Alternately, this could be leaping and running from branch to branch on foot -- or a combination of any of those methods of locomotion. The base movement for this skill is 40 feet, which is not subject to dash but could be increased magically. For a full appreciation of this skill, watch the movie House of Flying Daggers.

Contortion
This allows a person to fit into and move through a smaller space than normally would be allowed. Further, there is a chance to remove oneself from being tied or shackled, similar to the knots skill. Escape can be attempted each five minutes with success if rolling a body feat (DC:14) for rope and (DC:20) for shackles. If someone also has knots as a skill in addition, then escaping rope-binding is (DC:12) and can be attempted once per two minutes.

Diplomacy (requires Influence)
This skill permits a character to speak without interruption from others for thirty seconds, unless someone else in the crowd also has the same skill. Also, as an enhancement of charisma and social engineering, the skill allows a person to influence others, making the DC used by the victim to increase by 4 points, rather than just 2 from the influence skill. Further, if using in combat as a complete action, which disallows other actions or reactions until the remainder of the round, then sentient, language-speaking combatants can be convinced to make a momentary truce for one round. This is performed at the end of the round by each hearing opponent, who understands the language and has free will, to roll a mind preservation save (DC:9). If a majority of the opponents fail and take pause, then the following round the diplomat can clearly explain or articulate why the fight should not continue. This may or may not be effective based on the conditions and responses barked by the enemy leader. Moreover, this truce cannot be used more than once in a single combat.

Rock Climbing (requires Climbing)
This is an enhancement to the climbing skill, allowing the person to use the following modifiers for the conditions rather than the base skill. All other conditions skill combine.




Movement while bracing between 2 surfaces+8      
Rough Surface, Rock, Mortar+4      
Smooth Surface With Handholds+0       
Overhang, Traversable Ceiling-3      


Edited By Dj the GM at March 30, 2021 11:37

Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 30, 2021 10:00 AM
With the introduction of the gnomes, several new skills are now recorded. However, most are still effectively considered secrets of the culture.

Horology (requires Gear Mechanics) Cost: 400
Technically, this is the science of time-keeping. However, from a game-application standpoint, this is more than that as it it involves the creation and engineering of minuscule gears for exceptional accuracy and precision. With this skill, a winding mechanical timepiece, clock or pocket watch can be created. Moreover, this is a coveted and protected skill that is primarily known by the gnomes. Few outside of that society would have access to this skill.

Mago-horology (requires Horology) Cost: 500
This skill crosses the boundary of engineering into the mystic. The use of small mechanical gears can be used to harness and store magical energy, essentially converting mechanical energy, like a windmill or waterwheel, into magical energy and stored in a way that it can be released at a later date. An example might be a horological channeling object to store spell points.

Clockwork Engineering (requires Alchemy, Horology ) Cost: 500
This gnomish technology is used to create clockwork constructs. These automatons require fuel, and there are more details in the GM Aide documentation.

Advanced Clockwork (requires Clockwork Engineering, Mago-horology) Cost: 600
This gnomish technology is used to create clockwork constructs which are magically powered by internal mechanisms. There are more details in the GM Aide documentation.

Edited By Dj the GM at March 30, 2021 10:01

Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 16, 2021 03:27 PM
Swarming (New Combat Skill)

While every participant must possess the skill, this allows a group to use its numbers to overwhelm fewer opponents. To create a swarm, all participants gain positions in adjacent hexes to their opponent or opponents. Further, a swarm cannot exist until there are three participants greater than the enemy. This establishes a swarm. When swarming, a +1 to hit bonus is gained for every swarm member greater than the enemy, up to a maximum of +8. Two small creatures can fight in one hex, while medium creatures can be the only occupant of a hex. This means small swarming creature can exceed the physical six hexes against a single opponent for bonus awards while medium-sized creatures cannot. The partner ploy skill does not count as extra participants for the swarm; however, defenders with the skill can count as two persons for the calculation of the swarm commencement and bonus.

And yes, goblins and kobolds will have this skill as a racial ability.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 14, 2021 10:17 PM
Anthem of Excitement (New Adventuring Skill)

When the minstrel performs this as an action, its effects continue until the end of his or her next turn. The effect is selecting a single ally target other than the minstrel to gain an additional d20 attack die for melee combat. This die is not subject to the 5d20 maximum rule. Should the songster be a musician, then two allies can be affected. If he or she be a maestro, then three targets can be enhanced.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 14, 2021 10:02 PM
Encouraging Verse (New Adventuring Skill)

This grants the ability to use musical notes to disrupt mind-influencing effects. As an action, the minstrel begins a performance that lasts until the end of his or her next turn. Upon the next turn, the action may be to continue the performance. During that time, the player and any friendly creatures within 30 feet gain advantage on saves against being frightened, charmed and even phantasms. A creature must be able to hear gain this benefit. The performance ends early if player becomes incapacitated or silenced. Further, the songster could voluntarily end it (no action required). The skill of the music maker impacts the effect of the performance. Should a musician perform this action, then in addition to advantage, +1 on the save is gained. Should it be a maestro, then +2 is gained. Further, it should be noted that only one song type can be performed at one time.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 14, 2021 09:48 PM
Song of Rest (New Adventuring Skill)

By performing with a musical instrument, this creates soothing music which offers all the same benefits as short rest for the minstrel and all friendly creatures within 60 feet. However, the duration of the song only requires thirty minutes. If the songster is a musician, then the performance to gain the benefit only requires fifteen minutes; plus, one extra spell or priestly point can be recovered by each person who choses that option for the rest equivalent. Finally, if the one playing is a maestro, then the duration is still fifteen minutes but two extra spell or priestly points are potentially restored. Recovered quality points, spell points or priestly points can never exceed their maximums from this effect.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 14, 2021 09:32 PM
Inspiration (updated skill)

After training in minstrel, a person with this skill can play that instrument in an inspirational way so that two allies, at the player’s choosing and must be other than oneself, gain +1 to hit dice rolled in combat attacks so long as the songster continues to play. This effect cannot combine with any other bonus which gives bonuses to attack, meaning to highest value of multiple effects is used. However, if the music player is a musician with the instrument, then those two allies gain a +2 bonus instead. Finally, if the one performing the inspiration is a maestro, then the bonus is +3.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 14, 2021 12:53 PM
Countermove (New Combat Skill)

This is an enhancement to the rebuff skill uses as a reaction when being attacked. Using a melee weapon, the countermove redirects some of the damage into another creature occupying an adjacent hex from the original attack. The missed dice (using the highest scores first) up to half of the total attack dice are pushed on to the adjacent target from this parrying-type maneuver. If those scores are capable of striking that target, then damage is inflicted. Thus, if an attack of 2d20 were made and one dice successfully hit while the other missed, then the combatant could direct the strike to over-swing and hit the attackers nearby ally for 1 point of damage, assuming the missed die score is sufficient to strike that ally's AC. However, if the attack were 4d20 and three dice missed, only two dice could be redirected.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 13, 2021 09:11 AM
Mounted Fighting (updated description)

This can only be used for an animal specific to the mountsmanship prerequisite. Further, the animal must be a war-trained mount. When fighting atop such a beast, this skill conveys an extra d20 for attacks by using the mass and momentum of the mount. A maneuver this skill allows is using weight of the horse to knock down opponents of medium or small size category, using a shoving attack and the better of body modifiers between the rider and horse. Further, if knocking down an opponent from a flanking position or from behind, the +2 to added to the attacker's competition roll.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 07, 2021 05:38 PM
Getting The Drop

During a sneak attack, it is possible to “get the drop” on the opponent. This action can only be taken as a sneak attack; however, it offers an option for intimidation and bluffing rather pure bled shed. Further, for this to be effective, the victim must be intelligent enough to recognize the threat and have the free will to surrender. “Getting the drop” on a wild animal or zombie is pointless. When the victim is not a valid target, the GM will inform the player to inflict the damage for the sneak attack, barring really bizarre circumstances such as attacking a phantasmal illusion.

When attacking the unaware opponent, the player rolls the dice as an attack but announces that damage will not be inflicted. What this means is the bow-shot is pointed at the back of the target's head or the knife is on the throat, but the actually inflicting of damage is being held. Also, the attacker is free to speak at this point as well, since it is his or her turn. From a game mechanics standpoint, until releasing the dominant position, the character who “got the drop” on the target can inflict all the previously rolled damage automatically on the next action or reaction, plus the reaction can be when anyone else moves to assist or the target resists. This move can be used against leaders to discourage the underlings to fight and often will avoid combat or bring combat to a parley, but it does not always. (Do you feel lucky, punk?)

Not all is lost for the victim, as there is a chance to squirm and fight back since the damage has been delayed. As the next action or reaction, the assailant chooses to inflict the damage, the victim is permitted a body feat save (DC:20) to suffer only half damage. If the victim has foul-play, then that save is rolled at advantage. For each combat round after (or one minute if during non-combat negotiations), the DC drops by one point to a minimum of a DC:14.

Keep in mind that this can become a series of complicated “drops” as a partner might be invisible and then “get the drop” on the original attacker to negotiate the release of the original victim. Also, consider that the player and the GM know how much potential damage the “drop” can inflict, but no other players or NPCs are aware of that meta-gaming detail. Lastly, there will always be special scenarios that are difficult to manage which come from this situation. For example, “getting the drop” on a devil who can teleport at will might be able to do so before the reaction can be made. These circumstances will be adjudicated by the GM.

Edited By Dj the GM at March 7, 2021 05:50

Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 02, 2021 11:53 AM
The rules for artificing have been added to the manual. The primary explanation can be found in the vocational skills section; however, there have also been some prerequisites added in other sections.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Mar 02, 2021 09:51 AM
The GM Details Section has been removed from the Rules section and placed into its own menu item on the website.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Feb 28, 2021 05:20 PM
Some slight wording changes to the flee attack and the impalement maneuver subsections of Combat Detailed have been made. While only minor, these could have significant impact on the strategies used by some characters and players.

FLEE ATTACK
When a creature moves through the adjacent space around someone with a melee weapon at the ready also with an available reaction, then a special attack, known as a "flee attack," may be taken against the enemy by using the reaction. Examples of this circumstance could be due to the combatant breaking from a stance, running through to get to another location, attacking on the run and continuing, merely running through a guarded area, or even an aerial assault and flying back out of range.

However, there are many circumstances that must be evaluated. Mostly the movement rate of the being entering the unsafe area is the chief determinant of how to handle the event. If the movement used in that round is between 20 feet to 70 feet, then this is considered normal combat speed. Moving 15 feet or less is considered cautious speed, while movement rates at 75 feet or greater are called rapid speed. These speeds are only calculated based on the movement used in the current round, even if previous rounds they have traveled faster on a continuous path closing the distance.

When leaving an area at a cautious speed, the creature is assumed to be in a semi-defensive mode and actively guarding against attacks; therefore, no flee attacks can be made against someone moving through adjacent spaces at such a slower rate. Therefore, so long as there are open spaces to use, a combatant could make its normal attack then warily back up 15 feet (or three hexes) where no one could use a reaction for a "flee attack." However, in the same circumstance, if the combatant ran back 30 or 40 feet, this would be an actual fleeing from the melee allowing those able to gain a free attack as a normal attack against that person. There is one caveat to this normal speed exist maneuver, being if the combatant uses its action to be defensive-only, then movement in that round would allow leaving the fray while also preventing the adjacent opponents from attacking. Finally, when moving at a rapid speed, flee-attacks are fair game; however, because of the immense speed of the one moving, only 1d20 is permitted for the "flee attack" which still costs as a reaction.

Special environment attacks or movement should likely be considered rapid speed regardless of the actual movement; however, if coupled with caution defense, the GM might rule it to be cautious speed instead. Circumstance that might apply are low-to-the-ground fly-by breath weapon attacks, some sort of declared simultaneous closing, such as jousting, attacking from the surface of the water and diving back down, or phasing out of stone or earth for a melee strike then moving back into such special protection.

Another scenario to consider would be a person blocking a hallway where there is only a small space to get by. When a free space, the person moving can avoid a direct struggle by running by; however, if this is by using an adjacent space, then the blocker can still use a "flee attack" reaction. However, if the one moving must run through the same space, then a strength competition will occur, using d12s and body modifiers to resolve the conflict. If the blocker wins, the the combatant could not get through, but if not, then movement can continue; however, even so, the blocker is still free to use a flee-attack reaction if available.

IMPALEMENT MANEUVER
When wielding a polearm and having the polearms skill, a special impalement maneuver can be used as a reaction. One might think of it as a preemptive flee attack under precise conditions. If an opponent using a melee style, who also closes from 25 feet or farther in the same turn before making the attack and attacks the owner of the polearm, then the recipient is permitted a reaction known as impalement. To be clear, this is a reaction; the wielder of the polearm is still allowed a normal attack in the same round. To be even clearer, this could never be combined with a sneak attack, as it is a reaction.

This reaction interrupts the action prior to the attacker rolling his or her d20s for attack. It also occurs ten feet (two-hexes) away with all its results happening before the originating attack event. If the reaction damage incapacitates the attacker first, then the initiating attack is nullified.

With the base skills required to perform an impalement maneuver, a total of 3d20 are rolled in the reaction; 1d20 for a polearm attack and 2d20 for the impalement. However, if the pikeman has weapon forte in the specific polearm being used, then 4d20 are rolled. Lastly, if this pole is a glaive, then the heavy property will cause disadvantage on a natural 18 to 20.

Because of this maneuver, strategy on approaching defenders with polearms will likely be used. If a pikeman is 45 feet away, the combatant could close that distance and strike in the same round. A daring fighters may still chose to do so; however, other battlers may chose to close only 30 feet, avoiding the range of an impalement reaction, fore go that attack and complete the movement and strike the following round. Likewise, pikemen man choose to backup at a cautious speed, based on the timing of all the initiatives, to reintroduce that space needed to allow for the maneuver.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Feb 22, 2021 04:31 PM
The following three paragraphs have been added to the Sorcery section:

While much of sorcery is mental, nearly all spells require verbalization of arcane words to ensure the proper magical threads combine for the effect. However, not every axiom requires speaking, meaning a few can be cast in the midst of a silence effect, similar to the limitation with divine powers. Further, many axioms will also require physical gesturing to help with the manifestation. And finally, occasionally some sorcery will rely upon external components. Scry is one such example. All of this is address specifically for those who subdue a sorcerer to better understand binding hands and gagging the caster will prevent spell-usage in most cases.

On the flip side, the requirements may also determine whether the sorcerer can perform his or her magical in secret. Verbal intrinsics of an axiom must be annunciated distinctly and at a normal speaking volume; therefore, casting such spells clandestinely in virtually impossible. However, gesture-only axioms may sneak by observers. Those in combat will notice spells almost automatically, unless the GM rules a condition such as blindness or other circumstance. However, for those casually observing the area can notice a gesture-only spell during a non-combat scenario by making a normal Perception check (DC:11). If the caster has the stealth and is specifically attempting to hide the action, then the Difficulty is raised to 13.

Also, if the axiom requires only a gesture but the sorcerer is shackled, bound or otherwise restrained, then there is still a very small chance the caster might manifest the spell, assuming the other factors are not inhibited. In such a case, if the sorcerer can made a mind-feat save (DC:20), then the spell can occur. The GM might adjust appropriately for the knots skill or other circumstances. However, if failing the casting, the spell points attempted will be lost. Further, maintaining concentration, if needed (see below), may also be adjusted by the GM. Finally, mental-only axioms, which tend to fall into the detection category, cannot be observed without magical aid. Further, mental-only effects are extremely difficult to prevent; however, captors have been known to render sorcerer's unconscious or even strike them with a weapon of nonsense to prevent casting.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Dec 18, 2020 03:32 PM
More Divine Powers
Dj the GM
Posted at
Dec 17, 2020 10:55 AM
Roughly half of the bestiary has ben updated to reflect the changes for AC and body modifiers.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Dec 16, 2020 11:32 AM
New craftsman armors can be found in the Armor and Market sections.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Dec 15, 2020 03:15 PM
I've also added Fey Binding in the vocational skills.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Dec 14, 2020 08:51 PM
New skills in the vocational section. These are:
• Fiend Practicum
• Magical Research
• Occult Lore

It should be apparent that I am working on giving the scholar/sage character value in the fantasy world. I have more lores and practicums in mind, but I will need time to test and run numbers for them.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Dec 13, 2020 09:48 PM
There have been a few changes that have been made to the manual. Here is a quick summary:
• Body modifiers are no longer part of the calculation for Armor Class.
• Modifiers are +1 for every 2 points.
• Steel weapons cannot be silvered.
• Natural 20s cannot be dodged, rebuffed, etc
• Total Spirit score is added to the total Priestly Points usable
• Total Mind score is added to the total Spell Points usable

Several creatures will have to be recreated and characters refreshed.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Dec 04, 2020 08:17 AM
Rules about Petrification were overlooked when writing the original manual. However, those have now been added here.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Nov 23, 2020 07:57 AM
There are a few new Combat Skills that have been added. At least one of these is significant to even the moderately skilled front-line fighter. Specifically, these skills are Style Leverage, Style Dominance and Two-Handed Mastery.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Nov 10, 2020 11:55 AM
Several more skills have become available in the manual. Roughly 10 new Combat Skills (mostly specific and circumstantial ones), a couple of Adventuring Skills added, and around a dozen or more Vocational Skills are now available. As a result, the starting skills table has also be updated.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Oct 27, 2020 03:50 PM
A few more details have been added to the rules. If you are playing a priest character, then note that standard church training will definitely warn you about Abyssal Fever.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Sep 07, 2020 12:01 PM
Just a few more minor updates to the rules. Actions that can be taken during a fight are better detailed in the Combat Detailed section. New action types explained are Pushing, Defending and being At The Ready.

Further, falling damage is explained in the rules now.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Sep 03, 2020 03:09 PM
Under the Economy section, there is now a very detailed Market section.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Sep 02, 2020 09:57 AM
A minor but important change has been made to quality bonuses. Rather than +1 for each 3 points, the new award (using the round-down rule) is now 2½ points. This makes the new increments for bonuses: +1 for score 2; +2 for score 5; +3 for score 7; etc.
Dj the GM
Posted at
Aug 31, 2020 11:56 AM
There have been a few minor updates to the manual, specifically in the Combat Skills section as well as enhanced details added in the Weapons section.
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