Rules

Enchanted Realms Rulebook

 Contents
 Introduction
 Character Creation
     Stats
     Skills
 Races
     Arachnicians
     Dwarves
     Elves
     Gryf
     Humans
     Merfolk
     Orcs
     Saurians
 Understanding Skills
     Skills Training
     Stat Training
     Advancement
 Skills Applied: Combat
     Defense
     Bulk
 Mechanics of Combat
     Initiative
     Terrain
     Encumbrance
 Unskilled Fighting
 Fighting At Distance
 Economy
     Equipment
     Supplies
 Combat Skills
     Trained Fighting
     Standard Combat
     Avoidance Skills
     Style Combat
     Mastery
     Augmentations
 Skills
 Sorcery
     Augmentations
     Axioms
     White Sorcery
     Violet Sorcery
     Blue Sorcery
     Green Sorcery
     Yellow Sorcery
     Orange Sorcery
     Red Sorcery
     Black Sorcery
 Sensations
     Perception
     Normal Vision
     Darkvision
     Spirit Sight
     Hearing
     Olfactory
 Divine Abilities
     Doctrinal Skills
     Abilities
     Rituals
 Religion
     Bilnula
     Ellarien
     Gods of the New Moons
     Kaihnis
     Mehenganou
     Trumeix
     Urudon
     Xocathan
 Other Rules
     Asphyxiation
     Character Development
     Feat of Strength
     Karma
     Language
     Pain
     Poison and Disease
     Recovery
     Riding
     Slitting Throats
     Stat Difficulty Check
     Tracking
     Work Projects
Introduction

Enchanted Realms was created to be played on a virtual table application. The current choice of the author is Roll20.net. By using its API, character sheets and macros, it solves many of the “problems” of table-top play and encourages collaborative story-telling rather than sessions of hack-n-slash. This manual is free and updated frequently. The latest version can be found at http://EnchantedRPG.com, and if you use and enjoy the game, please consider a $5 donation for further development of the game.

Because of concerns over restrictions due to classes, too much math and overly slow, complex combat, the original design was to simplify the rules to the extreme; however, after several months of play-testing, such simplicity was not able to handle some of the more imaginative and creative parts that role-playing offers. Our answer was to push the math and repetitive tasks off to an automated system. We chose Roll20.net to manage the combat, game-logic, time-tracking, character-sheet management, allowing the players to focus more on the story and their character development. By devising numerous macros, which are available on this website, an API and custom character sheets, most of the work gets performed by automation. In fact combat is nearly point-and-click, among other programmed rules.

Further, there are certain “world details” offered in this set of rules. By no means is the intent that GMs and players must use the list of deities or religions catalogued here. However, these are usable samples to demonstrate the balance of skill, powers, etc. when using those aspects of the game. Also, much of the API has been designed for these religions and skills. So, there is an advantage to using them.

Lastly, while mortality and the need for teamwork is a design factor of the system, the intent of Enchanted Realms is to be a “low player death” game. Of course, death can occur, but it should be rare, climactic, meaningful or just out of horrible events resulting from avoidable choices. Moreover, while possible, bringing characters “back to life” is not as common as other systems. This is a game, designed for fun and entertainment. It is not a competition between players and the GM. Of course, permission from a player to be killed for story advancement or to change to a new role is perfectly reasonable. The idea is no one dies because the player rolls a “01” while lighting a torch or is tricked by the GM into walking through a souleating mirror. Then again, if the group wants to run a high-risk, high-death campaign, then by all means - have at it.

With that disclaimer aside, I hope you enjoy the system.